DISPLAYING ITEMS BY TAG: MICROSOFT

As a school, we are always ready to learn from and with others. Our creative and challenging curriculum, which we are incredibly proud of, has only been able to become as successful as it is through the work that we have done with other schools. Through local, national and global partnerships, we have been able to learn so much about ourselves and that is why we value collaborative learning so much, for both pupils and teachers.

While there are many different virtual learning environments available on the market, some with high running costs, Microsoft Teams is a practical solution for teachers who want to incorporate educational technology into the classroom.

Being a Computing teacher means that I have to demonstrate and model concepts and topics through the computer regularly. Whether it is displaying to pupils how to open an app or access a program through to skills building knowledge of software tools and techniques, modelling is an essential part of any Computing teacher’s toolkit. In the past, I have found that pupils watching a live demonstration of, for example, changing the background colour of a leaflet they are making or inserting code into a computer program can result in them wanting to revisit the steps taken to achieve this in order for consolidation to happen. This is where Microsoft Stream has made me reconsider how to approach modelling in my lessons.

The BLOODHOUND Project have announced the launch of Race for the Line’s second season. Working closely with Microsoft Education and the British Army, the Race for the Line Rocket Car Competition will be rolled out to 4,000 schools across the UK, reaching an estimated 112,000 students. Billed as the world’s largest STEM initiative, the competition will see 150 STEM school events held per year. Schools and youth groups must register by 31st October to receive their free rocket car kits.

How are cloud-based technologies being used in the US education system? Edtech expert Anthony VonBank discusses the opportunities afforded to American schools, and the pros and cons of each.

[As seen in the February 2014 edition of our magazine]

It’s not hard to see why cloud-based productivity tools are a hit with educators and students. With a minimum of setup time, teachers can share documents from a variety of formats, allow them to manipulate the documents in real time, and make copies for their own records. Students can work collaboratively on documents and presentations, create surveys and operate spreadsheets from different computers, anywhere in the world, in live time.

Get articles like this every week 

 

We promise to protect your personal information. Read our privacy policy.

  • "Inspiring every school by sharing the latest ideas and innovations"

  • USEFUL LINKS

    About  
    Contact
    Privacy
    Terms
    Press

  • OFFICE ADDRESS

    Watergate Building
    Crane Wharf
    New Crane Street
    Chester
    CH1 4JE
    United Kingdom

  • GET IN TOUCH

    [email protected]
    +44 (0)1244 312 720

In order to make our website better for you, we use cookies!

Some firefox users may experience missing content, to fix this, click the shield in the top left and "disable tracking protection"