DISPLAYING ITEMS BY TAG: SCHOOL TRIP

I write this at the start of April, whilst enjoying a view some may call “paradise”: sat on Long Beach, in Pulau Perhentian Kecil, with the South China Sea lapping up against my toes. It’s been a well-needed ‘switch off’ after the last three-to-six months (the last three in particular). The added benefit of five days without working WiFi was not lost on me. Whilst naturally there were those who worried about my radio silence, being blissfully ignorant of literally everything going on outside of a 1km stretch of beach has been quite refreshing! So how has this benefited me as an international educator?

Not so long ago, geeks were often considered outcasts - both in schools and in society at large. Although they bonded with other like-minded people, geeks didn’t typically mingle in mainstream culture.

In September 2017, the world’s imagination was captured by the ‘monster fatberg’ - considered the world’s biggest - that was found blocking the sewers in Whitechapel, London.

At St Andrew’s CoE School in Croydon, we are passionate about building strength, resilience and confidence in every student, in order to give them the best chance of success and fulfilment in life.

It takes a village to raise a child. It takes a community to work together to provide support and guidance, resources, and practical help. This is especially important when someone - a child, a family - faces challenges and are feeling lost and alone. Schools are, by their very nature, a community. Built of myriad parts, it has human relationships at its heart: teacher-pupil, SLT-teacher, head-governors, and so on. This community, as a system, when functioning well, has the children, at its core.

All children need support both at home and at school, feeling happier and more secure when the two work collaboratively as one. This is when effective learning takes place; pupils grow in confidence and self-esteem and feel fulfilled. So, how do we as schools achieve this partnership and make it work effectively for our children?

Dinosaurs in the Wild is a new time-travelling educational adventure that whisks visitors back 67 million years to an incredible research station, TimeBase 67, where they come face-to-face with living dinosaurs. Dr Darren Naish - zoologist, author and illustrator - explains how the show uses the most recent discoveries in palaeontology to create a truly immersive experience for Primary school pupils.

Here at WorldStrides, one of the world’s leading educational travel providers, we have an exciting year lined up for you! With 50 years of experience, we've taken over 7 million students on educational trips - over 400,000 students travelled with us last year alone! For 2017/18, we want to show how our new features can help even more UK schools head abroad to explore foreign locations.

I flew for the first time at the age of seven, and have never looked back. The fact that my parents had decided to holiday abroad was a chance to catch the rays and learn the lingo. What they did not know, however, was that our family dynamic would change forever. We were to travel from Romford to France by bus - yes, bus! From Romford market we would spend approximately 20 hours snaking our way across southern England collecting other eager families before finally boarding the ferry to France. What people often fail to mention is that travel was extremely different in the 1980s - the bus had no air conditioning and never a toilet.

Do you remember the excitement of going on a school trip? You’d rush home to give your parents a paper permission slip, gleefully hand it to your teacher the following day and then spend the rest of the week looking forward to venturing out of the school gates with your classmates.

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