Bett 2017: Our day four recap

Innovate My School

Innovate My School empowers educators to think beyond traditional boundaries, lead proactively and, most importantly, feel inspired. It now entertains an audience of 50,000 educators through its weekly content, with 1,300 guest bloggers and over 2,500 articles published to date.

Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

While Saturday was the shortest day of BETT 2017, there were still plenty of edtech  for attendees to see. Many of you came to our stand to discuss your work or to film Innovation Bursts, which was a tremendous honour for us. We’re always looking to work with educators from all areas of the sector, so to have classroom teachers, school leaders, consultants, suppliers and trainee teachers get involved was great for both feedback and future content! There was even a moment when the stand was invaded by a number of the Primary Rocks team!

We started our day by taking in a session helmed by two good friends, as Nathan Ashman and Carmel Bones (pictured above) took to the stage for ‘Demystifying virtual reality: Exploring VR's potential to transform teaching and learning’. Here, they showed how VR can immerse pupils to no end, for example by viewing a ‘crime scene’ to examine details in-depth, or entering an alien world for the purposes of creativity. Nathan demonstrated how such technology, given VR’s exciting nature, can be used to retain pupils’ attention. "The average human's attention span is eight seconds,” he said. “Some of you will have drifted off already!"

Then, using the example of school trips, Carmel illustrated how learners can also view the same experiences over and over - ideal for when key elements are missed the first time around. Teachers can record voiceovers for virtual tours of historical locations, lending both depth and entertainment to the learning!

Shortly thereafter, the Learn Live: Secondary was taken over by faces well-known through the likes of Twitter and TeachMeets. Chaired by #Teacher5aDay creator Martyn Reah, ‘Can happiness be taught?’ looked at how teachers can cover both pupils’ and their own wellbeing. "We spend a lot of time thinking about young people's wellbeing, but do we spend enough time on our own?" the deputy head asked. In a conference engulfed in edtech, the session provided a rather reflective moment to remember to look after the people using it. If anyone in attendance wasn’t aware of #Teacher5aDay, they were now.

We also got to meet many of the innovators exhibiting in the BETT Futures area. For example, the Touchable Universe team were illustrating how they’re allowing pupils to feel surfaces (here, the human tooth and gum) through a joystick device. Meanwhile, the Studytracks team were illustrating how music and beats can aid recollection and retention of the core syllabus. Even Sir Bob Geldof (who knows a thing or two about music) visited their stand, donning headphones to listen to songs that were created specifically for revision.


We could have seen more of the day’s events (such as Mark Boylan’s ‘Cross Curricular Computing’, Alison Wilcox’s ‘Online learning in SEND for teachers’, Simon Johnson’s ‘Minecraft Education Edition’ or Ministry of Science Live), but we were frankly overwhelmed by the sheer number of teachers stopping by to find out about what we do.

What were your highlights of BETT 2017? Let us know below! For more information - especially if you want to submit your own Innovation Burst - get in touch on [email protected]

Register for free to continue reading
Registration is a free and easy way to support us.
When you register, you'll join a grassroots community where you can:
• Enjoy unlimited access to articles
• Get recommendations tailored to your interests
• Attend virtual events with our leading contributors
Register Now
Login

Latest stories

  • How to handle stress while teaching in a foreign country
    How to handle stress while teaching in a foreign country

    Teaching English in a foreign country is likely to be one of the most demanding experiences you'll ever have. It entails relocating to a new country, relocating to a new home, and beginning a new career, all of which are stressful in and of themselves, but now you're doing it all at once. And you'll have to converse in a strange language you may not understand.

  • Is Learning Fun for You, Teacher?
    Is Learning Fun for You, Teacher?

    Over the weekend, my family of five went to an Orlando theme park, and I decided we should really enjoy ourselves by purchasing an Unlimited Quick Queue pass. It was so worth the money! We rode every ride in the park at least twice, but one ride required us to ride down a rapidly flowing river, which quenched us with water. It was incredible that my two-year-old was laughing as well. We rode the Infinity Falls ride four times in one day—BEST DAY EVER for FAMILY FUN in the Sun! The entire experience was epic, full of energizing emotions and, most importantly, lots of smiles. What made this ride so cool was that the whole family could experience it together, the motions were on point, and the water was the icing on the cake. It had been a while since I had that type of fun, and I will never forget it.

  • Free recycling-themed resources for KS1 and KS2
    Free recycling-themed resources for KS1 and KS2

    The Action Pack is back for the start of the brand new school year, just in time for Recycle Week 2021 on 20 - 26 September, to empower pupils to make the world a better and more sustainable place. The free recycling-themed resources are designed for KS1 and KS2 and cover the topics of Art, English, PSHE, Science and Maths and have been created to easily fit into day-to-day lesson planning.

  • Inspire your pupils with Emma Raducanu
    Inspire your pupils with Emma Raducanu

    Following the exceptional performance from British breakthrough star Emma Raducanu, who captured her first Grand Slam at the US Open recently, Emmamania is already inspiring pupils aged 4 - 11 to get more involved in tennis - and LTA Youth, the flagship
    programme from The LTA, the governing body of tennis in Britain, has teachers across the country covered.

  • 5 ways to boost your school's eSafety
    5 ways to boost your school's eSafety

    eSafety is a term that constantly comes up in school communities, and with good reason. Students across the world are engaging with technology in ways that have never been seen before. This article addresses 5 beginning tips to help you boost your school’s eSafety. 

  • Tackling inequality in EdTech
    Tackling inequality in EdTech

    We have all been devastated by this pandemic that has swept the world in a matter of weeks. Schools have rapidly had to change the way they operate and be available for key workers' children. The inequalities that have long existed in communities and schools are now being amplified by the virus.

  • EdTech review & The Curriculum Lab
    EdTech review & The Curriculum Lab

    The world is catching up with a truth that we’ve championed at Learning Ladders for the last 5 years - that children’s learning outcomes are greatly improved by teachers, parents and learners working in partnership. 

  • Reducing primary to secondary transition stress
    Reducing primary to secondary transition stress

    As school leaders grapple with the near impossible mission to start bringing more students into schools from 1st June, there are hundreds of thousands of Year 6 pupils thinking anxiously about their move to secondary school.

  • Generation Z and online tutoring: natural bedfellows?
    Generation Z and online tutoring: natural bedfellows?

    The K-12 online tutoring market is booming around the world, with recent research estimating it to grow by 12% per year over the next five years, a USD $60bn increase. By breaking down geographic barriers and moving beyond the limits of local teaching expertise, online tutoring platforms are an especially valuable tool for those looking to supplement their studies in the developing world, and students globally are increasingly signing up to online tuition early on in their secondary education schooling. 

  • Employable young people or human robots?
    Employable young people or human robots?

    STEM skills have been a major focus in education for over a decade and more young people are taking science, technology, engineering, and maths subjects at university than ever before, according to statistics published by UCAS. The downside of this is that the UK is now facing a soft skills crisis and the modern world will also require children to develop strong social skills as the workplaces are transformed by technology. 

In order to make our website better for you, we use cookies!

Some firefox users may experience missing content, to fix this, click the shield in the top left and "disable tracking protection"