DISPLAYING ITEMS BY TAG: TECHNOLOGY

Augmented Reality is a new and upcoming technology which could have a big impact in education across the board in the coming years, and in the modern world children are using and becoming accustomed to technology at a much younger age. Technology is also influencing our lives at a much greater scale than ever before which is why it is important that the education sector keeps pace with this and prepares children for the world they will be inheriting in the future. The classroom must always try to reflect the world children are experiencing outside.

As seen with UK education secretary Damian Hinds’ recent challenge to education suppliers, edtech is due to be a bigger area of concern for schools than ever before. It’s therefore vital that school leaders know where to spend their stretched budgets. But how can you go about doing this in a market with so many options?

What will our classrooms look like in 2017? It really depends on whose crystal ball you look at! School budgets are being squeezed tighter than a jar of peanut butter at a squirrel convention. As a result, teachers are looking for free tools and apps to enhance their schemes of work and create resources using video and animation to help engage students, particularly reluctant learners. Leadership teams are now examining the prospect of creating a sustainable ICT solution that suits our new digital learners and will still be relevant in the future.

Today, I visited Chicago, a beautiful city. I also climbed Zermatt in Switzerland, and later took part in a study on sharks swarming over a wreck in the ocean. My equipment was quite simple: a smartphone, two little lenses, some cardboard and an elastic. Pretty simple, but ingenious. A virtual reality experience through Google Cardboard.

Schools across the UK are being invited to take part in a national survey of internet use by pupils when at home. Education consultant Brett Laniosh from Catshill Learning Partnerships, who are carrying out the survey, said that the results will provide valuable information to schools on the range of hardware such as laptops, tablets, consoles and smart phones being used by young people.

Imagine Mr Jones, an urban schoolteacher who has been teaching eight-and nine-year-olds for the past five years. The few times he has introduced his students to a learning app or digital game, they have nearly levitated off their chairs with excitement. But he couldn’t get past the gee-whiz factor. The feeling that edtech was entertaining, but not germane to his teaching.

Personal statements are a vital part of the application process for university places. They are the one written piece of work that the universities staff dealing with applications will read. This is the chance for the students to make their voice heard, demonstrate what they are really about and what they are interested in. This can and does have an impact on admissions decisions. With more and more competition for places, they are playing an increasingly important role.

Multi-award winning science laboratory software LabCamera, after 5M+ sold licenses, is now free for teachers. Designed by Intellisense to spice up lessons and grab pupils’ attention, LabCamera is an innovative Science exploration app which allows teachers and pupils to explore scientific concepts using either their own device’s built-in camera, or any external camera.

In celebration of Finland’s centenary year in 2017, the team behind Finnish edu-innovators HundrED are looking at the future of education worldwide. A global, non-profit project, HundrED is aiming to bring together a vision of education for the next 100 years, collecting 100 innovations from Finland and a further 100 from around the world, along with commentary from global thought leaders. The findings will be documented as a book, a documentary, a series of international seminars and a toolkit for teachers, all to be shared with the world for free.

I have just finished my 22nd year of teaching. By rights, as a teacher, I should be pretty stale now. Most classes should groan when they realise that they will have me as a teacher. They might imagine that I am one of those teachers who goes back to a folder of worksheets, digs out the most appropriate one for the class, wipes off the dust and makes enough copies of it for my students to let them complete it and so on. After all these years my students might think that I should know how to teach everything and that teaching grammar topics is something I have mastered and can do off the top of my head. Surely, they imagine, I have mastered the job and do it the same old way as I have always done - the job is easy for me and perhaps my students might think that I am a little boring.

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