Latest articles from the Innovate My School community.

The benefits of opening up school facilities for community use are manifest. It benefits users such as community groups and sporting clubs by providing them with facilities, while schools can generate vital income and build strong community bonds. Kajima Community works with over 380 schools nationwide to streamline and manage their lettings process. For schools, this can provide a valuable source of income at a time of stricken education budgets. Last year, schools using their BookingsPlus service raised £16.3 million: an average of £43,000 per school.

Greater community cohesion benefits pupils - opening up opportunities for work experience with lettings partners, providing access to specialist coaches and stimulating a sense of community responsibility. Schools are public facilities, and should be a resource for the wider community. With over 15 years of experience in community lettings, Kajima Community works closely with its partners to understand their needs matching them with those of the local community.

For further ideas on how best to embrace Community Partnerships, check out the below content, running all through April and May! 

Stephen Logan is both a school leader and an expert on careers education (as director of National Careers Week), so we absolutely had to rendezvous with the Yorkshire-based educator to pick his brain...
If you’re looking for an inspirational and educational school trip, you might not know that vertical wind tunnels provide the perfect opportunity to engage your class in STEM topics with a thrilling, hands-on learning experience!
Jim Stark: Nobody talks to children. Judy: No, they just tell them. Rebel Without A Cause (1955).
What changes are needed in the UK education sector? We posed this question to 10 of today’s leading gurus - here’s what they said.
Numerous studies indicate that tomorrow’s jobs will demand “creative problem-solving skills”, but what exactly are these skills? Also, are they being taught effectively to the next generation - a group facing a massive shift in job requirements as workplace automation becomes more prevalent?
We live in age where there is unprecedented pressure on schools and school leaders. The pressure of a challenging and ever-changing Ofsted framework, budgets which are paper-thin, progress measures which force us to compare our pupils with other children nationally, and some of the most academically-stretching testing expectations ever. It’s enough to make the most experienced of school leaders crumble. Set against this context, it is easy to see ...
In Estyn’s 2013 inspection report, there were 355 pupils at St Philip Evans R.C. Primary School. The school is in an English-speaking part of South Wales. About 40% of pupils learn English as an additional language, and speak other languages at home. About a quarter of pupils are entitled to receive free school meals. The school identifies 17% of pupils as having additional learning needs, nearly all of whom have moderate learning ...
For children with special educational needs (SEN), one of the toughest barriers to accessing the curriculum can simply be how intimidating the classroom can feel. With 70 per cent of those permanently excluded from school also being registered for with SEN, we need to do more to engage students to maintain their attendance and ensure that functional skills are developed among all students, no matter what their situation or environment.
Of all the stories in the news at the moment, plastic pollution is one of the most shocking. However, the most shocking things about it has nothing to do with the visuals that we are bombarded with daily via the media. The most shocking thing about plastic pollution is that it is a problem, created by adults, that will affect our children so much more than it affects us.
“Teachers warn learning through play can lead to pupil disruption” was the title of an article printed by a Scottish newspaper in January this year. The article cited a recent report which had shown that some teachers in Scotland were worried about increasingly poor behaviour within classrooms when engaging in active learning.
When it came to SATs, Natalie Carry, deputy headteacher at St Edward’s Primary School in Birmingham, had a real problem. “We were finding it difficult to find questions for the pupils to answer,” explains Natalie, “and we were using booklets but these can only be used once.”
‘Powerful professional learning helps children succeed and teachers thrive’ is the first message on the front page of the Teacher Development Trust website. Yet when we look at other countries that are seen as successful at education, commentators often focus on issues such as their culture (Finland or Estonia), teaching methods (‘Chinese Maths’ in Shanghai) or use of external tutoring (Japan or South Korea).
Page 6 of 155

In order to make our website better for you, we use cookies!

Some firefox users may experience missing content, to fix this, click the shield in the top left and "disable tracking protection"